Writing for Jitte

Kata (型 or 形 literally: “form”) is a Japanese word describing detailed choreographed patterns of movements practised either solo or in pairs. The term form is used for the corresponding concept in non-Japanese martial arts in general.

Kata are used in many traditional Japanese arts such as theatre forms like kabuki and schools of tea ceremony (chadō), but are most commonly known for the presence in the martial arts. Kata are used by most traditional Japanese and Okinawan martial arts, such as aikidō, iaidō, jōdō, jūdō, jūjutsu, kenjutsu, kendō and karate. Other arts such as t’ai chi ch’uan and taekwondo feature the same kind of training, but use the respective Chinese and Korean words taolu and hyeong, respectively.

Kata originally were teaching/training methods by which successful combat techniques were preserved and passed on. Practicing kata allowed a company of persons to engage in a struggle using a systematic approach, rather than as individuals in a disorderly manner

Jitte is one of the shotokan (the style I study) kata I practise. I have tried to match words to the movements which although often bigger than used in bunkai-application of the techniques are effective martial tools.

Jitte

(Ten Hands)

Ower the rod of iron,

Tae rax an splinter the threat

Than agin hold tae cut.

Lang as the serpents tung

A bow

Huid fast instance an block-

Ane oot, the ither haun bak.

Retreat on yersel,

Baith airms up as angels

The weapon held in the wings,

Efter you spread.

Ane, twa an a third stamp tae brak,

Afore the lest sang an counters;

Attack the haun nae the wuid,

Afore cleek, twist an steal-

The weapon is noo yer ain.

Feenshin the pattern:

Aw directions held fast,

High an low strike and block

Claymore o sinew an bane

End an ending aince mair,

Twistin hips tae spin attack up high

Lestly wi the speed o ten legs

Slide in, hips, legs, airms sneckit ticht.

Saft yet wary,

Ready for the rod or bow.

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